Asian Vegetable Cigars

Asian Vegetable Cigars - The Minimalist Vegan

The recipe for these asian vegetable cigars was accidental. I was saving the mixture from a failed attempt at making vegan and gluten free dumplings. I think I got a little too ambitious with trying to make them gluten free. I will attempt it again though using different flour.

So I was standing there in the kitchen with a dough that was cracking like crazy and wouldn’t really work and had all this mixture that now had no home. So I thought to myself, what can I create with this mixture now?

I went back to my childhood of eating filo pastry with spinach and ricotta – which we call burek. You can make it with so many different fillings, but my family was vegetarian so that was the most popular combination in our household.

I decided to go and buy some filo pastry and create these gorgeous asian inspired cigars and add some other herbs and spices like coriander and turmeric. I also thought that the addition of tamari and toasted sesame seeds as a dipping sauce would add another layer of flavour.

So by mistake, this recipe was born. I was really happy with the way that they turned out and they are so easy and quick to make! Especially when you can put all the vegetables through a food processor. Here is a photo version of how I was rolling them. It’s super easy and really no skill is required.

Asian Vegetable Cigars - The Minimalist Vegan

Asian Vegetable Cigars - The Minimalist Vegan

Asian Vegetable Cigars

Total Time: 45 minutes

6 cigars

Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, grated
  • 6 medium sized mushrooms, grated
  • 1.5 cups carrot, grated
  • 1 cup cabbage, grated
  • 1 tbsp ginger, finely grated
  • ¼ tsp turmeric powder
  • ⅓ cup coriander, chopped
  • ⅓ cup of extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper for seasoning
  • 6 sheets of filo pastry, cut in half to create 12 sheets
  • ¼ cup Tamari sauce
  • 1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds (optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C (350F) and grease a flat baking tray.
  2. Combine all the grated vegetables, turmeric, coriander ½ cup of the olive oil and season to taste. Mix well.
  3. Only bring out the filo pastry when you are ready to start rolling them as otherwise the pastry will dry up and start cracking on the corners.
  4. Use 2 sheets at a time, placing ½ cup of the filling in the middle lengthways. (see images above)
  5. Place the two short edges over the filling then roll making sure you pull the pastry tight over the filling - not too tight as you will tear the pastry. Work with it delicately.
  6. Place the cigar with the edge facing down on the baking tray and grease it with the oil.
  7. Repeat this process until all the filling is gone. You should get about 6 cigars.
  8. Place in the oven and bake for 30 minutes or until the pastry is brown and crispy.
  9. Take out of the oven and spray a little water on them to bring down the puffiness and place a tea towel over them for around 5-10 minutes.
  10. Serve with tamari and toasted sesame seed sauce.
http://theminimalistvegan.com/asian-vegetable-cigars/

These are a great entree or as a snack when you need to grab something on the run. Keep them in the fridge, they will last around 3-4 days.

Vegan Asian Vegetable Cigars - The Minimalist Vegan

8 comments… add one
  • Olivia Johanson 07/07/2015 Reply

    This looks yummy, perfect when craving for some savory snack. Thanks for sharing this recipe…

  • I love that these are a majorly upgraded spring roll. Phyllo (how I spell it ;)) is such a great flaky texture to use in savory and sweet dishes alike. Your cigars look delicious!

    • Awesome addition to the kitchen right? I have an amazing recipe using filo or should I say phyllo 😉 coming tomorrow! Keep an eye out for it 🙂

  • Anne E. McGuigan 10/07/2015 Reply

    Hi Michael,
    Some of the best things in life rise up out of the ashes, as they say. I have used phyllo dough to make all manner of appetizer and dessert for special occasions and have always enjoyed the result. I have one quick comment though. I have always cooked the filling before assembly and am concerned that the water in the veggies might cause the pastry to become soggy. What are your thoughts on this?
    Many thanks,
    Anne

    • Hi Anne,
      It depends on what I’m making. With this particular recipe I don’t mind it being a little bit softer on the bottom as it still does crisp up just fine without being floppy. They do have the double layer of the pastry so it seems to hold together just fine. If you feel that your pastry will make it too soggy, then by all means, squeeze out the excess water.
      Thanks,
      Masha

  • Alex Hatji 20/09/2015 Reply

    I made these to share at a vegan friend’s farewell morning tea. They lasted all of a couple of minutes! Interestingly it was the non-vegans that tucked into them first and wanted to know what was in them because they are so delicious. I need to practice my cigar rolling technique as my first attempts were a little flat. I did find that a fair amount of liquid settles to the bottom of the filling, so I transferred it to a strainer over a bowl to sit whilst I was rolling the pastries. I highly recommend these, and will be making them again soon.

    • Hi Alex, great to hear that you enjoyed the recipe and your non-vegan friends did too!

      You can also add some polenta or break crumbs in the filling to soak up the liquid if there is too much and to give it a little bit of volume.

      Thanks for sharing! 🙂

Leave a Comment

Top