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2 Comments

  1. I find it odd that despite claiming to care about all living beings, this article mentions absolutely nothing about the human cost in the silk industry. The commercial silk industry is almost entirely propped up by child labor, slave labor, and exploitation of vulnerable, rural south Asian communities. The fact that your main protest of wearing silk comes from caring about silkworms, with not a single sentence devoted to the human rights abuses that permeate the industry, is frankly offensive. Additionally, many of the silk alternatives you listed also rely heavily on unethical labor practices. I know this is an old article, and the author likely won’t see this comment, but I think it would reflect better on the author if they added some research on the exploitation of humans in the industry as well. I’m sure this was not intentional, but this article makes it feel like the suffering of silkworms is more important than the suffering of marginalized and exploited communities and workers.

    1. Hi Liz, there’s no doubt it would be beneficial to include information about child labour. In saying that, the focus of this post, as suggested in the title, is about whether silk is considered vegan, so naturally, this article is focused on the exploitation of silkworms. For example, we recently published a piece about the ethics of fishing, which led to coverage of forced labour as it’s a broader topic.